Model No: RCM Audio Sensor Prelude IC phono preamplifier

Availability: 1

Category: Pre-Owned Equipment

RCM Audio Sensor Prelude IC phono preamplifier

  • $2,149.00

Phono pre-amplfier.  Works with both MC and MM cartridges.  Unit is black in color and functions flawlessly.


MUSICAL MATTERS
From the outset it was clear that this RCM unit is a highly capable design, preserving the various elements of a piece of music, its melody, harmony, rhythm, together with the timbre of different instruments used to create colour and dynamic counterpoint, delivering what I can only describe as musical splendour.
Using Ortofon’s ‘Kontrapunkt b’ moving coil cartridge in my Townshend Rock Reference with Excalibur arm as a source, the hypnotic, oriental-sounding arrangements on David Torn’s Cloud About Mercury [ECM 1322] were eagerly examined in analytical fashion. Mark Isham’s characteristic trumpet playing rasped when required and yet sounded deliciously sweet when it wasn’t.
   Tonally the RCM demonstrates a rich, ‘earthy’ quality which, while flattering of recordings that are lean in the bass, can sometimes spoil the clarity of bass information, for example when trying to hear variations in textures between Tony Levin’s bass ‘stick’ and the low synthesizer notes on Cloud About Mercury. In this respect the RCM proved to be not quite the equal of cost-no-object high-end designs such as Audia’s Flight Phono auditioned recently. But as The Sensor Prelude is half the price of the Italian Audia model it’s perhaps unfair to make such a comparison.
   Demonstrating its ability to create a holographic soundstage, it painted fabulous images of a band performing live with Eric Clapton’s ‘Double Trouble’ from Just One Night [RSO RSDX 2]. This classic 1979 recording from Tokyo’s Budokan Theatre sounded tremendously ‘raw’ and resonant, with full-bodied energy and pulsating dynamics that made the musical event wholly engaging. With the lights turned down and the gain turned up, the RCM helped my system depict the cohesive performance of the band in a most explicit fashion.


Phono pre-amplfier.  Works with both MC and MM cartridges.  Unit is black in color and functions flawlessly.


MUSICAL MATTERS
From the outset it was clear that this RCM unit is a highly capable design, preserving the various elements of a piece of music, its melody, harmony, rhythm, together with the timbre of different instruments used to create colour and dynamic counterpoint, delivering what I can only describe as musical splendour.
Using Ortofon’s ‘Kontrapunkt b’ moving coil cartridge in my Townshend Rock Reference with Excalibur arm as a source, the hypnotic, oriental-sounding arrangements on David Torn’s Cloud About Mercury [ECM 1322] were eagerly examined in analytical fashion. Mark Isham’s characteristic trumpet playing rasped when required and yet sounded deliciously sweet when it wasn’t.
   Tonally the RCM demonstrates a rich, ‘earthy’ quality which, while flattering of recordings that are lean in the bass, can sometimes spoil the clarity of bass information, for example when trying to hear variations in textures between Tony Levin’s bass ‘stick’ and the low synthesizer notes on Cloud About Mercury. In this respect the RCM proved to be not quite the equal of cost-no-object high-end designs such as Audia’s Flight Phono auditioned recently. But as The Sensor Prelude is half the price of the Italian Audia model it’s perhaps unfair to make such a comparison.
   Demonstrating its ability to create a holographic soundstage, it painted fabulous images of a band performing live with Eric Clapton’s ‘Double Trouble’ from Just One Night [RSO RSDX 2]. This classic 1979 recording from Tokyo’s Budokan Theatre sounded tremendously ‘raw’ and resonant, with full-bodied energy and pulsating dynamics that made the musical event wholly engaging. With the lights turned down and the gain turned up, the RCM helped my system depict the cohesive performance of the band in a most explicit fashion.

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